Nuclear Security and Detection

Nuclear Security and Detection

 

Research in nuclear security and safeguards aims to keep our societies safe from the impacts of nuclear materials while enabling safe, beneficial use of nuclear materials and technologies. Ensuring that nuclear materials and technology are used solely for peaceful purposes is one of our society’s most pressing challenges. Therefore, efforts are urgently needed to ensure the timely detection and understanding of the signatures of nuclear proliferation, including detection and characterization of nuclear materials at all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. Our mission is to meet this challenge by developing advanced tools to improve detection and timeliness for decision-makers and skilled talent for careers in nuclear security and nonproliferation. This includes areas such as stewardship programs, detection of illicit or clandestine nuclear programs, and radiation signature detection systems. Also, applications that can discover lost and orphaned nuclear sources. Implementation examples of such technology can be found in air- and sea-ports, nuclear facilities, and national and international monitoring stations.

Faculty

Photo of James Baciak James BaciakProfessor, Florida Power and Light Professor
Work Nuclear Annex 113 (352) 273-2131

Research Interests: Applied aspects of cargo monitoring, detector testing and characterization for gamma-ray spectroscopy, as well as development and analysis of techniques for environmental sampling and surveys related to on-site inspections.

Photo of Andreas Enqvist Andreas EnqvistNuclear Engineering Program Director, Florida Power and Light Professor
Work 100A Rhines Hall (352) 294-2177

Ph. D. Chalmers, University of Technology, Sweden

Research Interests: Nuclear safeguards, detection statistics of radiation from fissile materials, and the physics behind particle-detector interactions. Neutron physics & detectors. Neutron noise signals. Radiation signal analysis

Lab Website: Enqvist Research Group

Photo of Kyle C. Hartig Kyle HartigAssistant Professor
Work 180 Rhines Hall (202) 270-4721

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests: Remote Sensing, Nuclear Nonproliferation/counterproliferation, Nuclear Security, and Nuclear Policy

Lab Website: Hartig Research Group

Photo of Juan C. Nino Juan NinoProfessor
Work 166 Rhines Hall (352) 846-3787

Ph. D., 2002, The Pennsylvania State University

Research Interests: Multifunctional ceramics; energy materials; dielectrics and ionic conductors in bulk and thin film; single crystal growth; nuclear materials and detectors; bioceramics

Lab Website: Nino Research Group (NRG)

Photo of Nathalie Wall Nathalie WallProfesssor
Work 323 MAE Building (352) 273-0279

Ph.D., 1993, University of Paris, XI

Research Interests: Radiochemistry, Nuclear Wastes, Nuclear Forensics, Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Environmental Behavior of Radionuclides

Lab Website: Wall Research

Photo of Jiangeng Xue Jiangeng XueProfessor
Work 237A Rhines Hall (352) 846-3775

Ph. D., 2005, Princeton University

Research Interests: Nanostructured electronic materials, organic-inorganic hybrid materials, surfaces and interfaces, energy materials, photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes and other optoelectronic devices

Lab Website: Xue Research Group